Tag: over-age undercredit students

What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

March 31, 2017 by

What's new! star graphicNews

  • The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently awarded a $2.5 Million grant to Lindsay Unified School District and Summit Public Schools, called the California Consortium for Development and Dissemination of Personalized Learning (C2D2). By June 2019, they will develop an open source tool to clearly define personalized learning competencies for various personnel in the learning community. The tool will also identify systemic barriers that stand in the way of mastering these competencies and provide resources that support continuous improvement and development for the adults in learner-centered education.
  • Harvard’s Project Zero is studying how to teach for understanding and have found that when students have structures for thinking, better learning emerges.

Micro-Credentials for Teacher PD

Equity

School Designs

  • Red Bank Elementary, profiled by Education Reimagined here, is a leader in education transformation, designed around personalized, relevant, and contextualized pathways for each learner.
  • This USA Today article highlights how one Brooklyn school, Brooklyn Lab, is changing how students and teachers are taught. Brooklyn Lab is one of 10 to receive $10 million from the XQ: The Super School Project.
  • Washington’s Federal Way school board approved the use of a competency-based model for two alternative schools.

Student Agency & Voice

State Policy Updates

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Who’s Leading the Way?

January 12, 2017 by

A Promising Competency-Based Model for Historically Marginalized Students

who-is-leading-the-way-in-cbeCompetency-based education models are complicated organisms, and staging their development and growth is generally a multi-year task, whether one is a launching a new school or re-envisioning an existing program. As the world of CBE picks up momentum our team at reDesign is continually asking ourselves, “Who’s Leading the Way in Serving Historically Marginalized Young People?” In preparation for #iNACOL16 we documented some of our learning in a Prezi (pictured above). We will continue to add to it over the course of this year, so please let us know about the models you think of when you ask yourself the same question. (more…)

What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

November 18, 2016 by

What's NewNew Policy Resources for ESSA

School Models

Thought Leadership

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Building Capacity to Serve Off-Track Students with the Barr Foundation

September 29, 2016 by

barr-foundationThis post has been updated with corrections.

Our country has been talking about ways to improve secondary education for at least thirty years: school-to-work, small schools, senior year transition, early college, project-based learning, service learning, online then blended learning, deeper learning, authentic learning, ninth grade transition, inquiry-based learning, community-based learning, portfolios, and exhibitions. In the last year, there has been a whole new push, starting with a White House convening on high schools and XQ. Now add the Barr Foundation’s courageous and insightful effort to build secondary school opportunities to better serve students who are missing the skills or credits they need to graduate, (i.e. they are “off track”).

One has to ask why hasn’t there been more progress or why these models and practices haven’t had more scaling power, more staying power. Of course our analysis at CompetencyWorks is that the traditional structure of education is going to be a significant challenge, if not a barrier, to any new educational strategies for the following reasons:

  1. Students are passed on even when they haven’t learned what they need to learn.
  2. Traditional scaffolding strategies usually fail to help students to actually learn and master the pre-requisite skills they need to engage in high school curriculum. We insist on grade level curriculum even when students need something else in order to succeed.
  3. Even with the highest engagement strategies, the traditional point systems and GPA only motivate the highest achievers.
  4. Students simply do not have enough information to know what they need to do to do better (and in many cases the teachers don’t know either) and don’t have the support they need.
  5. There is too much variability in how teachers determine proficiency.

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Shaping Student-Centered Learning at Our Piece of the Pie

July 12, 2016 by

OPPThis is part of a series on mastery-based learning in Connecticut. See posts on New Haven Public SchoolsWindsor Locks Public Schools, Naugatuck Public SchoolsSuperintendents Leading the Way in Connecticut, and New Haven Academy. Connecticut uses the term mastery-based learning, so that will be used instead of competency education within the series.

“Our young people have already had the experience of being kicked to the curb. They are behind in credits and they are behind in skills. And there is no way for them to catch up in a traditional high school. Mastery-based learning offers a meaningful path to high school graduation. It is also effective in helping students strengthen the foundational skills they need for jobs and college. We are now pursuing dual enrollment with College for America. We can imagine a mastery-based pathway that focuses on building skills that can start in high school and move through college programs right into jobs.”

– Bob Rath

Bob Rath, CEO of Our Piece of the Pie®, Inc. (OPP®) in Connecticut, has dedicated his life to improving life outcomes for young people who have been slipping through the cracks of the public education system. OPP operates at the intersection of youth development, workforce development, and academics, serving young people who need help to finish high school, build post-secondary skills, or gain access to the labor market. At OPPortunity Academy and the other schools run by OPP, a mastery-based approach can further unify these approaches for students by focusing on what they know, what they can do, and what they need to do to advance.

Many thanks to Rath, Principal Rodney Powell, and Chief Operating Officer Hector Rivera for sharing their vision about how competency-based learning can form the backbone of multiple pathways to graduation and beyond for young people..

OPPortunity Academy

Bob Rath was one of the co-authors of Seizing the Moment: Realizing the Promise of Student-Centered Learning.

Bob Rath is open about the challenges of creating a comprehensive mastery-based model in an alternative school. “Student-centered learning and personalization have opened a door for engaging and teaching students who are over-age and under-credited (OAUC). To be stuck in a seat-time world is condemning them.” Rath explained that young people become OAUC in two different ways. Some have significant academic deficiencies – they are the victims of social promotion and fail a lot of courses, and suddenly graduation feels like an impossibility. For the second group, life happens. They move a lot, they end up in child welfare, they or their parents get sick, they have a child, or they get arrested. For students with complicated lives, attendance can be a problem. Rath noted, “Mastery-based learning allows them to pick up wherever they left off. It gives them hope. These two groups need different things; some young people need both. We are still working on finding the right model, the right mix of approaches.” (more…)

What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

June 7, 2016 by

What's NewTeacher and Ed Leader Insights

Thought Leadership

Assessments for Learning

Movement in the States

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What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

May 10, 2016 by

What's NewJOB OPENING: Henry County Schools is currently accepting applications for an open Assistant Superintendent position. Learn more about the job opening and read our recent case study on Henry County Schools.

Thought Leadership

School and Program Updates

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Ready by Design

April 30, 2016 by

ready by design coverAs middle and high schools across the country make the transition to competency-based structures to replace the sorting structures of the traditional system, they have to answer three big questions along the way:

  1. What do you want students to know and be able to do in order to be successful in the transition after they leave your school?
  2. What is your theory of how students develop? What is your philosophy of how to engage, motivate, and empower students to become lifelong learners who can be successful in college and careers?
  3. What is your pedagogical philosophy? What is your strategy of teaching and learning, and how is that put into practice in your school?

Some schools are very clear on these questions while others haven’t yet taken into account what research tells us about development, engagement, motivation, and learning. To help you think about the second question regarding adolescent development, take a peek at the new paper Ready by Design: The Science (and Art) of Youth Readiness by Stephanie Krauss, Karen Pittman and Caitlin Johnson published by the Forum for Youth Investment. (more…)

Breaking out of the Boxes at Building 21

March 9, 2016 by

B21This is the first post about my site visit to Building 21 in Philadelphia. Read the second here.

Of all the schools and districts I’ve visited over the past four months, it has taken me the longest to write about my visit to Philadelphia’s Building 21 (there is also one in Allentown) because their ideas just blow me away. I’ve had to take time to absorb them and figure out how to describe them to you. I’m guessing I still don’t fully understand the rationale and implications of some of their design decisions. The team at B21, led by co-founders Laura Shubilla and Chip Linehan, have been so intentional, so thoughtful, so focused on drawing on what we know is best for helping adolescents learn, and so out of the box. As districts both big and small make the transition to competency-based education, Building 21 is one to watch as it cuts the path toward new ways of structuring how we organize learning and advance students.

A few of the big takeaways from my visit to Building 21 are:

  • Designing for students with a broad spectrum of skills and life experiences
  • Cohesive competency-based structure with a continuum of performance levels
  • Two-tiered system to monitor student progress
  • Information system that is designed to be student-centered and teacher-enabling (see tomorrow’s post)

This post will hopefully be helpful in explaining B21. However, if you are interested, I highly recommend taking thirty minutes to look through the Competency Toolkit and the Competency Handbook. They’ve done a fantastic job at making their model accessible for students, parents, teachers, and all of us who want to learn from them. (more…)

Time to Tackle the Elephant

December 16, 2015 by

elephantWhy do we continue to teach students grade-level standards based on their age when their skills are actually two, three, or more academic levels lower?

In states and districts across the country, educators are frustrated and wondering why their students aren’t able to learn algebra as demonstrated on state accountability exams. There are conversations about redesigning the courses, more remediation, and even questions about whether the exams are too hard or the expectations too high. All of it assumes that algebra should be taught in a specific grade and that we will just keep teaching it to kids over and over again until they get it. What’s that saying about insanity – Doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results?

Competency education suggests another solution: Ensure that students have all the pre-requisite knowledge and are able to engage in skills based on where they are, not where they should be. When we teach them in their “zone” of proximal development, it is personalized learning (or student-centered if you prefer that language). When we teach students based on their grade, we are using the batch method of the antiquated factory model. It may help some students just to have more time and instruction to learn algebra. But for some who may have been passed on to the next grade without becoming proficient or who may have missed concepts along the way due to lack of class attendance because of housing instability, being in the child welfare system, or suffering from poor health, they may need to work in their zone to build up the pre-requisite skills. (more…)

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