Tag: teachers and teaching

Moving from Islands of Innovation to a District of Distinction in Personalized Learning (Part Two)

November 30, 2016 by

carverThis is the second post in a two-part series from Eastern Carver County Schools. Read the first here.

Simplifying and expanding
The strategic planning process from 2012 to 2014 laid the foundation for the development in 2015 of Eastern Carver County’s five-point personalized learning star. This addressed the uncertainty and variability we experienced in the earlier planning process. The visual aid tied together all of the pieces of work. The star includes key questions for school teams to answer.

  • Purposeful Learning: How do learners find relevancy and make connections between themselves and their learning?
  • Engagement with Learning Tools: How do learners purposefully select tools to support their learning?
  • Collaborative Environment: How do learners leverage their environment to maximize their learning?
  • Learner Voice and Choice: How do learners design and take ownership of their learning?
  • Purposeful Instruction, Assessment and Feedback: How do learners leverage relevant learning targets and authentic learning opportunities that meet their needs? How do learners use evidence and feedback to further their learning?

The district developed a website, wearepersonalizedlearning.org to provide resources and support to teachers, parents, and the community.

Using these five points, questions were posed to building level administrators at a monthly district leadership meeting. It was the last question — how do learners leverage relevant learning targets and authentic learning opportunities that meet their needs? — that was the most tantalizing and seemed to be the lever that propelled buildings toward full-scale implementation of personalized learning. The change in culture encourage educators to think differently about our work motivated many buildings to deepen their engagement in this work. Buildings sought out their pioneers and met this innovation mindset challenge by asking these same questions of staff. In one building, staff collaborated to integrate curriculum and standards around learning themes and tie their curriculum to these themes. Language around content changed to language around learning. By linking the learning together, teachers became facilitators of learning rather than teachers of content. Classrooms and hallways were transformed to create learning spaces with specific purposes and learners were consulted on what environment they needed for different learning opportunities. Bell schedules were tossed out in favor of student-driven schedules based on their needs. Teacher desks were moved to storage so classrooms could be transformed into learning environments each with unique purposes to support student learning. Time became more flexible with opportunities for learners to flex their time where they need for their learning. Teachers embraced informal learning time for student support and conferencing. Every nook and cranny in buildings became prime learning real estate. Is a student done with her learning in math, great! Now, flex out to open space to collaborate with other learners on science, or flex into a lesson with your world language teacher for more guidance. In one high school, teachers needing to be absent could opt out of a substitute teacher and use that time for tutoring, independent learning or group work. Bottom line: do what you need to do for your learning. (more…)

Moving from Islands of Innovation to a District of Distinction in Personalized Learning (Part One)

November 29, 2016 by
eastern-carver-collage

Brian Beresford, Clint Christopher, Dana Kauzlarich Miller, and Brenda Vogds

This is the first post in a two-part series from the educators at Eastern Carver County Schools. It was written by Brian Beresford, Clint Christopher, Dana Kauzlarich Miller, and Brenda Vogds. Visit them at www.district112.org.

Eastern Carver County Schools’ plan to personalize learning in every classroom of the 9,500-student school district challenges leaders, students, teachers and the district’s stakeholders. Consider how entrenched the so-called “factory” model is in our educational systems: lesson plans as discrete pieces of information, the organization of students by age, the design of schools and classrooms based on efficiency rather than efficacy. Most importantly, in the traditional model of learning, students have been passive participants, recipients of the teacher’s knowledge instead of having the opportunity to co-create their learning. We have reevaluated the classroom from the student’s perspective and it is driving many changes in order to deliver on the promise of exceptional, personalized learning. Eastern Carver County Schools’ commitment is to full-scale personalization districtwide. It is built on building-level planning and initiatives, moving from great ideas implemented in one classroom to schools where personalized learning is simply how they operate.

For nearly a decade Eastern Carver County Schools, a suburban school district in Minneapolis, Minnesota, of 9,500 students, has been reimagining public education. When voters approved a referendum for a second high school in 2006, it came with a commitment from district leadership to redesign secondary curriculum and better align courses on the 6-12 continuum. The focus was greater rigor, relevance, and preparation the demands of 21st century life and work. Elementary schools followed suit a few years later. Many program improvements were made to grades K-5. The most significant in our personalized learning journey was implementation of a continuous progress model to move students into appropriate math and reading based on learning level, not age or grade. There were two outcomes of this work. One was culture-building. The extensive changes to course sequences, bell schedules, student groupings, grade configurations, and attendance boundaries set the stage for larger systemic changes. This started a cycle of continuous improvement and promotion of a growth mindset among district educators. Second, the continuous progress model created a cohort of elementary students who were challenged based on what they knew, not their age. They would need more in the years to come. (more…)

“This Isn’t What I Learned In School”: Teachers Share Learnings from New, Competency-Based High Schools

November 22, 2016 by

At iNACOL’s Blended and Online Learning Symposium this fall, Springpoint—a national organization that supports new and innovative high school models—led a panel of teachers sharing practical lessons from their work in competency-based schools.

CBE Educators

What does it take to be a founding teacher in a new, competency-based school? How must teachers shift their mindsets and practice to thrive in this new setting? Panelists share hard-won lessons from adapting to competency-based teaching and learning, generating buy-in for the approach among their colleagues and students, and communicating with families about student progress. (more…)

How Can We “Do School Differently”? Lessons from Springpoint’s StorySLAM at iNACOL

November 21, 2016 by

At iNACOL’s Blended and Online Learning Symposium this fall, Springpoint hosted a StorySLAM—a session where principals, teachers, and students in competency-based high schools shared their stories in the style of The Moth’s live storytelling format. Focused on the theme of “Doing School Differently,” these compelling stories describe everything from a seasoned principal’s experience adjusting his school’s model to a student’s story of agency and empowerment in a new high school.

Watch and listen to each story below.

Rick Reynolds, founding principal of PACT (Problem-based Academy of Critical Thinking) recounts the intensity of moving to a new city to design a brand new, innovative high school. With a focus on adjustment in the face of challenges, Reynolds traces his school’s pivot from a heavily tech-driven model to a more balanced approach. Most of the changes were spurred by teachers and students themselves, and were successful as a result of the strong culture at the school. As Reynolds says, “when you create a school and kids feel empowered, and teachers are as passionate as you are, they will not be quiet if something is wrong.”

 

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Crucial Mindsets

November 17, 2016 by

love-of-learningIn order to transition to an effective learner-centered proficiency-based community, we have to make some important shifts in our stances as educators. Sometimes these shifts are subtle and nuanced. Other times they are clear and straightforward. Focus on and change in instructional practices will only take a learning community so far if the underlying philosophical stances do not change.

Before we go any further in exploring some of the crucial mind shifts, take a moment to check in on your own stances using the following survey. Take your time with it, and be completely honest. This survey is completely anonymous and for reflection purposes only. Emails and names are not being collected. You will be able to see a breakdown of how people responded.

Personalized Learning Check In

Now that you have checked in, honestly, with your educational stances, let’s talk about where we really need to be operating from in order to truly have a learner-centered proficiency-based learning community. (more…)

Learner-Centered Tip of the Week: Making Targets Visible…Really

October 28, 2016 by

aimThis post originally appeared on Courtney Belolan’s website on October 18, 2016. Belolan is the instructional coach for RSU2 in Maine.

We all know that making learning transparent is a key element of learner-centered proficiency based education. We’ve all gotten the memo: have targets posted. Many people have even taken posting targets a step further and posted all the learning targets for an entire project, course, or year. All of these methods can be a solid part of making learning targets and progressions visible to learners. The important thing to remember is that making learning really visible is about much more than simply slapping a learning target up on the wall; It is about developing learner agency. When learners know what it is they are supposed to be learning, and where that fits in the bigger picture of what they have to learn, motivation and engagement go way up.

If the goal is supporting learner agency, and not simply the posting of the target, we have to think differently about how we use targets. As a start, here are some target-posting pitfalls to be aware of, and some ideas about how to sidestep them and make the learning truly visible.

Pitfall #1: They Are Posted, And Rarely or Never Referred To

The point of having learning targets, or anything really, on the walls of a classroom is to have a visual reminder for learners. But anything that gets put up on the walls and ignored might as well be old wallpaper. Relying on the off chance that learners will notice or refer to them, even after being shown where they are, is not a successful strategy.

Sidesteps:

  • Have a consistent place in the room where current targets are posted
  • Point to the posted learning targets whenever you mention them
  • Mention the current learning targets at the start of every lesson

Pitfall #2: They Are Posted, And Are Too Small To Read From The Class Seats

(more…)

Learner-Centered Tip of the Week: The Perennial Homework Question

October 14, 2016 by

mathThis post originally appeared on Courtney Belolan’s website on September 29, 2016. Belolan is the instructional coach for RSU2 in Maine.

Just the other day a colleague sent me a note saying “please post about homework!” I can’t say I’m surprised, the homework question is one of the perennial questions in education; I even wrote about it last year. And like a stubborn weed, it spawns and shoots many other questions:

  • How much homework should students have?
  • Is homework for practice or learning?
  • Is it fair to assign homework that relies on internet access?
  • What is the purpose of homework?
  • How does homework count, if at all?
  • Does everyone have to do the same homework?

The truth is that despite all of the research compiling on the effectiveness of homework, the answer is a big thorny “depends.” Under the right conditions, homework can be a fantastic support for learners moving ahead and growing with their skills and knowledge. Under the wrong conditions, homework can actually be detrimental to learning. In a learner-centered proficiency-based culture, the homework weed can be even more noxious and thorny. We need to be considering the right conditions for every learner, every day.

If we step back and think about homework through the lens of personalized learning, we can come to some clarity around homework in our schools. Here are some questions to ask yourself about homework, and some resources to help you tame this weed. (more…)

Learner-Centered Tip of the Week: Moving to a Culture of Cooperation

October 7, 2016 by

paintThis post originally appeared on Courtney Belolan’s website on September 16, 2016. Belolan is the instructional coach for RSU2 in Maine.

The other week I sat in on a new teacher meeting at one of the elementary schools here in RSU2. The group, which included teachers new and new-ish to teaching or the school as well as teachers further into their careers, discussed ideas from the Responsive Classroom book The First Six Weeks of School. One comment in particular stood out, and has been bouncing around in my head ever since. I’ve even mentioned it to other teachers and teams who are working through culture building.

“.. it struck me this year that even with all the work I do in my room around building culture, the students still tend to see it as an adult-pleasing thing. When I am there everything runs well, but I often get notes from subs that sound like a completely different class.”

I think this is super important for all of us to think about. How are we working to make sure the culture we are building in our classroom and teams is also part of a larger school-wide culture? I have some ideas: (more…)

Learner-Centered Tip of the Week: Starting the Year Off Strong

September 9, 2016 by

Back to SchoolThis post originally appeared on Courtney Belolan’s website on September 2, 2016. Belolan is the instructional coach for RSU2 in Maine.

Welcome back! Students are back, and the buildings feel alive again. It is the end of the third day, and we are already settling into the year. As you and the learners get ready to start new learning adventures this year, keep these ideas in mind:

1. School and Classroom Culture Is Dynamic
Many teachers spend time at the start of the year working with the students to build culture. This is a hugely important step to creating the environment needed for learner centered and proficiency based systems to be successful. Even more important is setting up a plan for maintaining culture, and keeping it alive throughout the year. Visions, codes of conduct, SOPs, Flowcharts, all of these culture tools need to grown and change in response to feedback from the day to day, week to week, and month to month life of the classroom. Here are some ways to plan for culture maintenance from pK-graduation:

– regular team/class meetings (as much as every day, as little as once a month)
– a Parking Lot
– regular, simple self reflection on the vision and code of conduct
– recognition based on the vision and code of conduct (more…)

Three Big Ah-Ha!s for Teachers New to Learner-Centered Proficiency-Based Education

August 5, 2016 by

BulbThat time of year is getting close! Some of us will be back with our students in a matter of days, some weeks. Without a doubt all of us are thinking about how we want to do things this year and starting to get our plans ready. Here are some of the biggest ideas I support teachers through when it comes to learner-centered proficiency-based education. Whether your district is working toward a vision of personalized learning, or you are a curious educator ready to redesign your class, take a think through:

  1. You Will Not Be Writing 25 Different Lesson Plans For Each Class

When some people hear “personalized learning” they immediately imagine a classroom in which twenty-five students are doing twenty-five different things. Twenty-five learners with different needs. Twenty-five learners with different interests. A teacher popping around from kid to kid and never teaching a whole class at once, ever again.

That will never happen in an effective learner-centered proficiency-based system. The odds of it happening in a lone personalized learning classroom are slim to non-existent. Why? Because they, and we, are humans. It is much more likely that in any given class, for any given set of procedural or declarative knowledge, there will be a small number of core groups with a sprinkling of outliers. Further, a teacher who has been practicing for at least three years likely has a good sense about what those different groups will be, in terms of understandings and skills. The same is true for student interests! We can all think of at least five different interest areas that will hook most of our students. Sports, animals, pets, dance, music, visual arts, video games, outdoors, cars, what else? Teachers knows these things about students, and it doesn’t change too drastically from year to year. I am not saying “you already do this” because there are some important differences between this kind of grouping and tracking. (more…)

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