Tag: high school

Why Engaging Parents Matters: Maloney High School

May 17, 2017 by

This post originally appeared at Students at the Center Hub on March 22, 2017.

RESEARCH SUGGESTS THAT WHEN SCHOOLS PARTNER WITH AND ENGAGE PARENTS TO UNDERSTAND AND STAY INVOLVED IN THEIR CHILD’S LEARNING EXPERIENCES, THE PARENTS ARE MORE LIKELY TO SUPPORT DISTRICT INNOVATION, AND STUDENTS TEND TO HAVE BETTER ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL OUTCOMES.[1]

Francis T. Maloney High School in Meriden, Connecticut, held its first “Parent Walk” earlier this year, inviting parents and guardians to experience student-centered learning in action. Maloney had been hosting successful quarterly instructional and community learning walks, during which community members such as Meriden’s mayor got first-hand views of classrooms and students fully engaged in lessons. These walks helped to demystify the ideas behind student-centered learning by showcasing the academic and social benefits of student-centered approaches. Witnessing the impact and benefits of these instructional tours, leadership and staff at Maloney introduced the Walk to parents to ensure that families of students at the school can experience and fully support a learning environment that may not look like the one they experienced when they were in high school.

Lynette Valentine, a parent of Kaitlyn, a 9th grader, provides an example of the power of Parent Walks. She participated in the recent walk at Maloney, and was moved to write a letter of appreciation about her experience. The following is an excerpt from her letter to the principal of Maloney, Mrs. Straub, and one of the teachers, Mrs. Showerda.

“The first thing I noticed was the bright atmosphere–students were moving and alert–the classrooms were not lined up with seating, front to back in alphabetical order, like traditional classrooms. I could clearly see that Maloney’s learning structure involved both social and academic supports. Classes were engaging–students were able to work in groups and lean on each other, instead of having the teacher as the main resource. To me, this is perfect for socialization and helps students to be ready to enter the workforce­–figuring things out with a team is important! … When Maloney’s B.Y.O.D. (Bring Your Own Device) initiative first came out, I was at first skeptical but it is obvious that it truly works. What a way to engage students to learn! I witnessed teachers helping students interested in pursuing a direction they felt strongly about (e.g., an entrepreneurial experience for a business student). I wish I had the same opportunities when I was a student.”

Read Lynette Valentine’s full letter

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Why We Use Digital Badges at Del Lago Academy

May 3, 2017 by

This post originally appeared at Getting Smart on March 23, 2017.

Del Lago Academy in Escondido, California, is a public high school of about 800 students focused on Applied Sciences. Educators here really want students not only to have desirable skills and knowledge for potential employers but to do meaningful work in school that feels relevant and connects to their lives now.

In order to ensure we’re meeting these objectives, we realized we needed a way to assess what students were doing throughout the scientific process and not just by observing the final projects they turn in. Thus our digital badging system, Competency X, was born.

Digital badges fill in the gaps for how we describe what scholars know and can do in the real world. Traditionally, most scholars only have a transcript of coursework to represent what they can do. Digital badges unbundle the competencies within both courses and workforce experiences to help fill in the gaps of larger credentials (e.g., degrees and certifications). This allows them to be more precise about what a learner is capable of accomplishing. (more…)

Encouraging Learning Risks and Growth

May 2, 2017 by

This is the fourth and final post on Student-Focused Learning in Springdale, Arkansas.

We want students to take learning risks and press themselves to learn and achieve beyond the minimums we expect and require. We know that after they leave us, their success will greatly depend on their ability and inclination to take responsibility, make commitments, and push themselves to risk, learn, and grow without always having to be pushed.

Yet, the traditional design of schools is based on assumptions of compliance, responding to the direction of adults and meeting the expectations of others. More than one hundred years ago, when the American public school system was designed, these conditions made sense. Most students would leave school and enter a workforce where compliance, following directions, and meeting external expectation were most of what was required.

The world has changed and will change even more in the decades today’s students will spend in the workforce. In an era of learning and innovation, success will require commitment, curiosity, creativity, and courage to act, even when not all elements and implications of the situation are known. Preparing today’s learners for their future asks more of us and them than the legacy design of schools can deliver. We must create a new set of learning conditions, expectations, and supports if we hope to have our students leave us ready for their futures.

This reality was reinforced for during a recent conversation with students at the Don Tyson School of Innovation (DTSOI) in Springdale, Arkansas. The conversation also gave me hope and confidence that it is possible to create these conditions and position students to take risks, venture beyond their experiences, and engage their world inside and outside of school with courage and commitment. The students were freshmen and sophomores who are learning in a very different environment than most adults experienced.

Interestingly, the students emphasized the importance of having adults around them who care deeply about them and their success, make risk-taking safe, allow mistakes and missteps to be part of learning – not embarrassing or shameful actions – and hold high expectations for their learning success. As one of the students explained, “We know that teachers here are in our corner. They want us to succeed, but don’t expect us to be perfect.” Another noted, “When we try something and it does not work out, or we fail, they are ready to listen, talk, and help us figure out what to do next.” (more…)

Finding Time and Providing Support for Student-Driven Learning

April 26, 2017 by

This is the third post on Student-Focused Learning in Springdale, Arkansas.

If we want students to be prepared to innovate and drive their future learning, they need a set of skills and experiences that prepare them. We cannot expect learners who have grown up on a steady diet of being told what to learn, when to learn, how to learn, and how well to learn to confidently and competently understand and engage in self-initiated learning as adults.

Yet, self-initiated and self-directed learning will likely play a key role in their ability to survive and thrive in an economy that is increasingly driven by learning and innovation. Once they leave us, they will no longer be able to depend on having what they need to know delivered in a professionally prepared, perfectly time, expertly delivered lesson.

What students know when they leave us remains important, but we cannot predict what they will need to know even five years beyond graduation. Many of today’s students will be engaged in work that has yet to be invented, using skills that have yet to be defined. In many cases, they will be asked to create and shape these roles, not just fill them.

This reality presents at least three challenges for us as we think about the allocation of time and our focus on learning priorities for today’s students. First, we must find time for students to engage in this type of learning without sacrificing development of core academic knowledge and skills. Second, we need to engage with students to create authentic, significant, and purposeful learning experiences in which they are active co-creators and shared owners. Third, students need to see learning as having value for them and relevance to their lives now and in the future.

I gained some important insights into how we can meet these challenges during a recent visit to the Don Tyson School of Innovation (DTSOI) in Springdale, Arkansas. The Tyson School of Innovation serves approximately 500 students, 47 percent of whom qualify for free or reduced lunch and more than 50 percent of whom are minorities. Most of the families do not have a history of education beyond high school. DTSOI was created through the imagination, creativity, and leadership of its principal, Joe Rollins. DTSOI has taken on the dual challenge of addressing core academic competencies while preparing students for the workplace of the future, and has some important insights and strategies to share. (more…)

Juarez Community Academy: When Big Schools Become Competency-Based

April 25, 2017 by

Principal Juan Carlos Ocón

This is the seventh post in a series covering my recent trip to Chicago. Begin with CBE in Chicago.

There are always exceptions, and Benito Juarez Community Academy (Juarez) in Chicago is one of them. At CompetencyWorks, we tend to advise against using grading as the entry point into competency-based education. It can create confusion and anxiety, especially in high schools, before the full competency-based infrastructure has been put into place. Yet Juarez successfully moved to standards-based grading, having used the practice for the last seven years, and is now ready to move to a fuller competency-based model. Actually, I think they have already taken the substantial steps to restructure their school as competency-based.

When Juan Carlos Ocón became principal, Juarez had been on the list of the forty worst schools in Illinois. In 2010, it jumped off that list. In 2008-2009, principal Ocon and his team began a deliberate and strategic shift from a content-based curriculum to a standards-based curriculum. This was a necessary shift that allowed the school to focus on what students should know and be able to do. In the spring and summer of 2010, Juarez adopted the College Readiness Standards. In 2011, Juarez continued to develop a schoolwide shift from what teachers teach to what students learn. Ocón explained, “After analysis and research on instructional and grading models, we needed to shift our focus from what teachers teach to what students learn. That is how we were going to improve rigor in the classroom. Benchmarking, therefore, is a system of instruction that is focused on student assessment and skills mastery.

At Juarez, we had a lengthy conversation with about fifteen teachers and administrators. I apologize, as I was unable to put everyone’s names with what they said as I normally try to do. Next time I visit Juarez, I’ll do better so that readers can get to know the leaders, administrators, and teachers there.

Background

Serving 1,600 mostly Hispanic students, Juarez is a neighborhood school offering an IB program and 5 CTE programs. There is a strong college counseling program that includes resources for DREAMers. In 2008, they began to introduce standards-based grading (SBG) with school-wide implementation in 2010.

They are now in a process of preparing for the transition to competency-based education or what they referred to as “resetting.” Principal Juan Carlos Ocón explained, “Moving to competency-based education is forcing us to revisit our core values.” The leadership team, including teacher leaders, organized a retreat with Camille Farrington and members of the UC Consortium on School Research to clarify their philosophy about education and equity.

Juarez is part of the high schools organizing the pilot under the state’s Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. (See CBE in Chicago for more information.) (more…)

Building Learning Momentum at Springdale’s School of Innovation

April 24, 2017 by

This is the second post on Student-Focused Learning in Springdale, Arkansas. Read the first post here.

I find it exhilarating when what I hear from people in the field brings to life what I have read in research and know from experience to be true. This sense is especially powerful when the insights come from learners.

I recently spent some time with a group of high school students at the Don Tyson School of Innovation (DTSOI) in Springdale, Arkansas, querying them about their experiences and what makes their learning lives at DTSOI stand out. I received an earful and it was great. It was especially powerful since so much of what I heard is highly consistent with what research tells us about motivation, the role of purpose in learning, and the importance of taking ownership for the direction of our lives.

As educators, we can spend a good portion of our time looking for ways and trying out strategies to motivate learners. We know that motivation is the entry point to stimulate and support engagement in learning. Without motivation, not much learning happens. Yet, as I listened to what these learners were describing about their learning and the environment at DTSOI, I kept wondering if we too often approach this challenge from the wrong direction. One of the young men captured this insight succinctly, “I now understand that I cannot wait for someone to motivate me. I need to be responsible for motivating myself.” What a powerful understanding about life and success! This student’s observation begs the question of whether we should be spending less of our time trying to motivate students and more time focusing on developing the ability and inclination of students to be the source of their own motivation. We know that the ability to self-motivate is a key life skill, but how can we build this capacity in learners? More about that later.

While I was absorbing the significance of helping learners build the capacity to motivate themselves, another student followed with an equally powerful observation. She noted, “At DTSOI, almost everything we do has a purpose. Whether it is what we are learning in class, participating in an internship, or listening to people talk about the real world, there is a purpose behind it.” Again, a powerful insight about success in life. The more we see the purpose in what we do, the more likely we are to focus on and persist in achieving what we set out to do. If we can help students to seek and see purpose in their learning, their success is likely to grow. If we can help them to transfer a sense of purpose to their lives, we give them a gift that can last a lifetime. Again, more about this later.

Yet another student observed that what makes learning at DTSOI unique is that students actively participate in planning their own learning paths. He noted that students, with their parents, have planning conferences with school staff. They set goals, decide the direction they want to pursue, and then select and create options and opportunities to form the learning path. Once the path has been created, learners still have regular opportunities to make adjustments and add experiences and elements that combine formal learning in school and community college with less formal, application-based learning in the community. It was clear from the discussion that students found this aspect of their learning very powerful.

So, what do we know from research about learning that parallels and reinforces the experiences these students shared? It turns out there is plenty. (more…)

What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

January 31, 2017 by

What's NewLindsay Unified School District transitioned to a performance-based learning system and is seeing results—with a 92% graduation rate (compared to 73% prior to transitioning); 42% of graduates currently attend a four-year university (compared to 21% before); and over 70% of graduates of those students will have a degree within 6 years. With Lindsay High School being recognized for its accomplishments by the White House in Washington, D.C., ranking in the 99th percentile of schools in California that are drug-free, bully-free, alcohol-free, and learner-focused, one would have a hard time finding someone who didn’t view Lindsay Unified School District as not only one of the top school districts in Tulare County, or in the state, but, arguably, in the nation.

Lindsay Unified School District released a new book: Beyond Reform: Systemic Shifts Toward Personalized Learning.

MCIEA Accountability Principles

The Massachusetts Consortium for Innovative Education Assessment (MCIEA) is creating a new school accountability model in Massachusetts that champions students, teachers and families. They adopted the following seven principles for creating a fair and effective accountability system:

MCIEA Accountability Principles

Open Requests for Proposals

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What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

January 4, 2017 by

What's NewUpcoming Events

CompetencyWorks is hosting a Leadership webinar on advancing competency education in New England on Wednesday, January 11 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. ET. Learn more and register.

New York City’s Mastery Collaborative is hosting upcoming Living Lab online sessions. Register here.

  • Wednesday, January 4, 4:00 p.m. ET: KAPPA International High School—Messaging Mastery with Language and Visuals
  • Thursday, January 5, 4:00 p.m. ET: Harvest Collegiate High School—Building a School-Wide Philosophy of Mastery

Reports

Podcasts

  • This podcast by Cortney Belolan and Matt Shea discusses the “what” and “why” of competency education, and the “how” of implementation.
  • Getting Smart released a podcast featuring students from the iNACOL Symposium’s student panel, sharing their thoughts on transforming K-12 education.

School Models

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What’s New in K-12 Competency-Based Education?

December 1, 2016 by

What's NewNews

States

Practitioner Perspectives

Agency

  • Fletcher Elementary School students are hiring staff for next fall, including job searches, reviewing applications, writing questions and conducting interviews—as a means to promote student leadership, agency and engagement.
  • Winooski School District shared a video highlighting their story of how personalized learning opened opportunities and prepared students for college and career.

Community Engagement

  • Colorado’s District 51 is engaging their community and setting a new vision for K-12 education by asking, “What skills do we want our graduates to have?”
  • The Vermont Department of Education has made stakeholder engagement part of their continuous improvement project as they transition to ESSA.
  • This article is an example of how one might work through the many concepts undergirding the shift to personalized learning—by questioning a broader way of defining student success and proficiency-based learning. How might you respond to someone who raises these questions in your community?

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What’s New in K-12 Competency Education?

November 18, 2016 by

What's NewNew Policy Resources for ESSA

School Models

Thought Leadership

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